Spring is the biggest season in the maltings film calendar and we’ve have a fantastic line-up to entertain you.  After the hurly-burly of year-end celebrations a film night at the maltings is the perfect treat. Throw in a homemade pizza and you’ve got dinner sorted too.

Adaptations

Kicking off the season is the adaptation of the novel by best-selling author Agatha Christie, Murder on the Orient Express tells the tale of thirteen strangers stranded on a train, where everyone’s a suspect. One man must race against time to solve the puzzle before the murderer strikes again. What starts out as a lavish train ride through Europe quickly unfolds into one of the most stylish, suspenseful and thrilling mysteries ever told.

 

 

The Death of Stalin is a British-French period comedy-drama chronicling the Soviet power struggles occasioned by the death of their dictator Joseph Stalin in 1953. The film is based on the graphic novel of the same name, translated from the French original La mort de Staline. The internal political landscape of 1950’s Soviet Russia takes on a darkly comic form by Emmy award-winning and Oscar-nominated writer/director Armando Iannucci.

Based on Peter Turner’s memoir, the film Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool follows the passionate relationship between Turner and the eccentric Academy Award winning actress Gloria Grahame in 1978 Liverpool. What starts as a vibrant affair between a legendary femme fatale and her young lover quickly grows into a deeper relationship, with Turner being the person Gloria turns to for comfort. Their passion and lust for life is tested to the limits by life events beyond their control.

 

True Stories

Based on the true story of producer Jonathan Cavendish’s own parents, Breathe is an inspirational story of Robin Cavendish, who has his whole life ahead of him when he is paralysed by polio whilst in Africa in 1958. Against all advice, Robin’s wife Diana brings him home from hospital where her devotion and witty determination transcend his disability. Together they refuse to be imprisoned by his suffering; dazzling others with their humour, courage and lust for life. This is a film about celebration of bravery and human possibility, a love story about living every breath as though it’s your last.

The stranger-than-fiction story of how the tennis courts of America became a gender battlefield in the early 70s was brilliantly told in The Battle of the Sexes. About 90 million people watched Billie Jean King take on ex-champ and serial hustler Bobby Riggs in the 1973 game, which was more than just a tennis match. Together, Billie and Bobby served up a cultural spectacle that resonated far beyond the tennis court, sparking discussions in bedrooms and boardrooms that continue to reverberate today.

 

 

Family Fun

There is something for everyone this Valentine’s Day! Bring you whole family to the screening of Paddington 2 on 14 February at the Maltings – the story continues the adventures of the little bear from Peru, who is now happily settled with the Brown family in Windsor Gardens, where he has become a popular member of the community. While searching for the perfect present for his beloved Aunt Lucy’s hundredth birthday, Paddington spots a unique pop-up book in Mr. Gruber’s antique shop, and embarks upon a series of odd jobs to buy it. But when the book is stolen, it’s up to Paddington and the Browns to unmask the thief…

 

The Award Nomination Worthy

As the Oscars season slowly kicks into high gear, some of the real contenders are beginning to make quite a buzz in the Best Picture race. Here are some of the films coming to the Maltings…

During the early days of World War II, with the fall of France imminent, Britain faces its darkest hour as the threat of invasion looms. As the seemingly unstoppable Nazi forces advance, and with the Allied army cornered on the beaches of Dunkirk, the fate of Western Europe hangs on the leadership of the newly-appointed Prime Minister Winston Churchill. Directed by Joe Wright, Darkest Hour is the dramatic and inspiring story of four weeks in 1940 during which Churchill’s courage to lead changed the course of world history.

Luca Guadagnino’s Call Me By Your Name is pulling in rave reviews for its honest depiction of a coming-of-age love story between two young men. It’s the summer of 1983 in the north of Italy, a precocious 17- year-old Elio, spends his days in his family’s 17th century villa transcribing and playing classical music, reading, and flirting with his friend Marzia. One day, a charming American scholar working on his doctorate, arrives as the annual summer intern tasked with helping Elio’s father. Amid the sun-drenched splendour of the setting, Elio and Oliver discover the heady beauty of awakening desire over the course of a summer that will alter their lives forever.

A teenage girl is brutally raped and murdered. After months pass without any progress on the case, her mother takes matters into her own hands. She rents three billboards outside of her small town, indicting the local police chief. Frances McDormand (Fargo, 1996) who plays the girl’s mother gives a powerhouse performance in Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. Those billboards, which lead to pressure on the chief, which leads to anger from his loyal officer, and so on and so on, down the line. You might think you have your finger on what this will be like from that description, but the simply perfect script written by Martin McDonagh is never quite what you expect it to be.

Steven Spielberg’s new film, The Post, headlined by Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep, dramatises the Washington Post’s publication of the classified Pentagon Papers, which exposed government lies about the Vietnam War. The two must overcome their differences as they risk their careers – and their own freedom – to help bring long-buried truths to light.

The Shape of Water finds visionary director Guillermo del Toro delivering the ultimate girl-meets-monster love story, set against the backdrop of Cold War era America circa 1962. Elisa is a mute, isolated woman who works as a cleaning lady in a hidden, high-security government laboratory. Her life changes forever when she discovers the lab’s classified secret — a mysterious, scaled creature from South America that lives in a water tank.

 

A Sequel to the Classic

Blade Runner may have shaped the future, but it’s easy to forget its past. Now universally accepted as a classic, the neo noir fantasy flopped in 1982. Set thirty years after the first film, Blade Runner 2049 (directed by Ridley Scott) sees Ryan Gosling plays K, a replicant (bioengineered human) who hunts rogue replicants. When he discovers evidence that a replicant has reproduced, he is tasked with destroying the child to prevent a replicant uprising. K’s discovery leads him on a quest to find Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford), a former LAPD blade runner who has been missing for 30 years.

To see all of the upcoming films this season, visit the film webpage.

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